Black Journal: The Black G.I. / No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger

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40 years on_Vietnam_ICON40 Years On: Screening the Vietnam War

Black Journal: The Black G.I. / No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger

  • 1969/1970 / 1968
  • Directed By: Kent Garrett and Stan Lathan / David Loeb Weiss
  • Rated Not Rated
  • Documentary
  • 123 Minutes
  1. Thursday, December 3, 2015 7:00 p.m.
Image from the film No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Whoa Nelly
Black Journal: The Black G.I. (1969/1970)
Directed by Kent Garrett and Stan Lathan
No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger (1968)
Directed by David Loeb Weiss
Black Journal was a weekly public television newsmagazine in the late 1960s/early 1970s that examined the many issues pertinent to the black American experience at the time. This two-part episode, The Black G.I. (55 min.), focuses on the experiences of black G.I.s in the Vietnam War. It features frank discussions from soldiers, ranked officers, and politicians about the racism that defined the different experiences that black soldiers had in this war.
While The Black G.I. focuses on black soldiers in Vietnam, No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger (68 min.) instead trains its lenses on the experiences of black communities in New York during anti-war protests in 1967. Interviewing a variety of people in the streets, as well as black veterans, the film presents a portrait of a moment in American history that stands as a timely and needed reminder of the power of public protest and action.
No Vietnamese Ever Called Me Nigger has been preserved with funding from the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the New York State Library, Division of Library Development and print is provided courtesy of the Reserve Film and Video Collection of The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts. Contains strong language. There will be a post-screening discussion. (16mm Presentation)