Double Exposure 2016

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Double Exposure 2016

  1. Sunday, March 6, 2016 6:30 p.m.
DoubleExposure2016
Double Exposure is an experimental program between Indiana University composition, audio engineering, and film students. The Indiana University Student Composers Association, with support from faculty members John Gibson and Mark Hood (Jacobs School of Music) and Susanne Schwibs (The Media School) along with IU Cinema present a program of original student work—film and music—presented with a live musical ensemble. Each film will be receiving its premiere presentation. (HDCam Presentation)


SCREENING ORDER:
Living the Dream (7:56 min)
Film: Keenan Crotty | Music: Luke Accera | Sound: Nick Collado
Both visually and musically, this film is an homage to the wonder of classic Hollywood cinema. Perhaps you will be reminded of your favorite movie moments and how they inspired you. Inspiration is powerful but only if realized.


Memories (5:38 min)
Film: Ashley Chambers | Music: Matt Recio | Sound: Misha Ulmet
This film is a tribute to my grandmother, using old VHS home movies of my sister and me to demonstrate the way the memories that you associate someone with change over time.

The Don (7:20 min)
Film: Kevin Nichols | Music: Ray Kim | Sound: Isaac Fink
Shot on VHS in a seemingly flawed style, The Don attempts to subvert the belief that the production value of content should be seen as an indicator of it’s worth.

Felt (4:35 min)
Film: Alex Crouch | Music: Matt Recio | Sound: Misha Ulmet
The way different textures appear to us is different depending on the material (organic vs. artificial), lighting (light vs. dark), context (the object’s ‘home’), and if we know what the whole object is. This film attempts to explore the different emotions evoked changing and playing with these elements.

Six (6:08 min)
Film: Marie Richardson | Music: Tyler Habig | Sound: Avery Reidy
Six is an experimental exercise in portraiture that focuses on the long-term friendship between six women. The project expresses how each woman contributes to the dynamic of the group through gesture, color, and instrumentation. The project is dedicated with compassion and gratitude to the filmmaker’s five life-long friends.


—— INTERMISSION ——


Don’t Smile Me (4:47 min)
Film: Reed Brown | Music: Christopher Neiner | Sound: Brian Berger
“Don’t smile me,” is often quoted by my parents whenever I’m put into an uncomfortable situation involving cameras. It seems strange that posing for pictures makes me so nervous, because I spend the majority of my time watching and producing video, but I am consistently unhinged by the forced family picture session. Maybe it is because they mean to capture happiness rather than reality. Or perhaps we just use cameras compulsively, and they have nothing to do with memories.

Haint (4:55 min)
Film: Yasmin Al-Jawad | Music: Justin Parish | Sound: Kim Hollkamp
Shot in Super 8 and 16mm, Haint is visually enticing exploration of the American Midwest’s Spirit, which can only be truly experienced when one opens their eyes. Coupled with a mesmerising visceral score, which implements flavours of bluegrass and allusions to church music, that encapsulate the essence of Haint.

広島エレジー (Elegy for Hiroshima) ( 6:29 min)
Film: Adam Lee | Music: Jordan Lenchitz | Sound: Mark Edlin
In literature, an elegy is a poem of serious reflection, often a lament for the dead. Following in this tradition, Elegy for Hiroshima grounds the viewer in the Hiroshiman experience and compels us to empathize and question the American narrative of the Atomic Attacks. Utilizing archival material and irradiated 16mm film from modern Hiroshima, this is an experimental documentary about the traumas of the past and the progress of the future.

Fugue (4:35 min)
Film: Zak Schwartz | Music: Isaac Allen | Sound: Alex Schopa
To be completely immersed in confusion is scary. There’s always something in the near vicinity to grab onto, to make sense of it. Sometimes grabbing is pointless. Sometimes you just let go. It happens. Fugue acknowledges that.

Summer Memorial (4:03 min)
Film: Nzingha Kendall | Music: Jay Hurst | Sound: Collin Thomas
Using vacation photos and videos eventually projected and recaptured on 16mm film, Summer Memorial is a voyage through time. Repetition and reordering suggest memory’s fallibility and elusiveness. The film offers a refuge from rational decoding and instead invites interpretation through the senses.

Cenotaph (4:31 min)
Film: Julie Lehégarat | Music: Andreas Foivos-Apostolou | Sound: Collin Thomas
Cenotaph [ˈsɛnətɑːf] n: A monument erected to the memory of a dead person interred somewhere else. Like an empty tomb, a cenotaph is a memorial to the dead but doesn’t mark the location where the remains rest.

Ensemble I: Conductor: Phillip Sink
Juliana Eidle, Flute
Wun Wai Ki, Clarinet
Erin Brooker, Harp
Liam Ramsey-White, Violin
Miles Edwards, Cello
Michael Metz, Percussion

Ensemble II: Conductor: Tal Samuel
Robin Meiksins, Flute
Emily Mehigh, Clarinet
Emmanuel Padilla Holguín, Harp
Shaina Pan, Violin
Will Rowe, Cello
Jacob Lipham, Percussion

Student Composers Association Officers:
Curtis Smith (President) | Kimberly Osberg (Vice President)
Chris Poovey (Secretary) | Erik Ransom (Treasurer)

Special thanks to: Susanne Schwibs, John Gibson, Mark Hood, Kim Osberg, Dean Gwyn Richards, Konrad Strauss, Manny Knowles, Jacobs School of Music Department of Recording Arts, Jacobs School of Music Percussion Department, Radio-Television Services, and IU Cinema.
Double Exposure is sponsored by the Student Composers Association, Jacobs School of Music, The Media School, and IU Cinema.