In Motion: Amiri Baraka

Ticketing

Tickets are required for all screenings. You can pick them up at the IU Auditorium box office during regular hours or 30 minutes prior to any IU Cinema screening. Learn more about IU Cinema tickets »

Parking

Parking is available near the IU Cinema at the Jordan Avenue Garage (open to all visitors). If you have an IU parking pass, you can park at surface lots near the IU Auditorium during the week after 5 p.m. Parking is free on weekends. Learn more about IU Cinema parking »

icon_changeA Change is Gonna Come

In Motion: Amiri Baraka

  • 1983
  • Directed By: St. Clair Bourne
  • Rated Not Rated
  • Documentary
  • 60 Minutes
  1. Monday, April 22, 2013 7:00 p.m.
Image of poet Amiri Baraka

To be screened with Rainbow Black: Poet Sarah W. Fabio (1976)

Sarah Fabio, Mother of Black Studies, and Amiri Baraka, the most widely published Black writer of his time, have rightfully established themselves as pinnacles of the Black Arts Movement. Unique in their approaches, the documentaries Rainbow Black: Poet Sarah W. Fabio and In Motion: Amiri Baraka take intimate looks at the daily struggles and revelations of these two iconic Black poets working toward “artistic beauty and social justice” in an era of social upheaval. (16mm and DigiBeta presentation)


Cheryl Fabio is scheduled to be present.


In Motion: Amiri Baraka profiles the outspoken representative - formerly LeRoi Jones - of the Black consciousness movement who has been a major figure on the American literary and political landscape for three decades. Set in Newark, Greenwich Village, and Harlem, this documentary follows Baraka from before his trial for "resisting arrest" and ends with his conviction despite allegations of police harassment.

The film visits Baraka at home preparing for the American Writers Congress, teaching a college class, hosting a jazz and commentary radio show, reading poetry, and speaking at an anti-apartheid rally. Interviews with writers Allen Ginsberg, Joel Oppenheimer, and A.B. Spellman, and activists Ted Wilson and Askia Toure provide insight into the modern day revolutionary, and the period which fostered him.